about,  programme

SCOPE AND OBJECTIVES

The Second World Conference has the aim to better identify strategies, programs and actions, able to provide solutions for coping with current critical challenges in the region through more sustainable Mediterranean
food systems, by bridging sustainable food consumption and production through the Mediterranean diet as a lever.

The acknowledgement of the Mediterranean Diet as a lever bridging production and consumption, in a sustainable and healthy way, can contribute to catalyze broader multi-stakeholder and innovative efforts, thus paving the way for coping with the challenges facing the Mediterranean countries. The Conference has the scope, with a science-based approach, to continue strengthening the dialogue, between North and South Mediterranean countries, by linking food security and nutrition to sustainability, for a shift towards more sustainable food systems in the region, for ensuring sustainable development, security, stability and well-being for present and future generations.

The underpinning rationale of the Second World Conference is that a better understanding of the multidimensionality of the sustainability of food systems will strengthen the dialogue between North and South countries

to address growing challenges for food security, nutrition and sustainability, in the Mediterranean region.

In the international debate on the sustainability of food systems, the interest on sustainable diets has grown in recent years, by linking consumption and production, and therefore, the interest on the Mediterranean diet as a sustainable diet model, with multiple benefits and country-specific variations, has been reawakened.

At the Conference, “research, innovation, sharing knowledge and capacity building” will be highlighted as driving forces for the shift towards more Mediterranean sustainable food systems for delivering the 2030 Agenda in the region.

By strengthening multi-stakeholder dialogues, from North to South and from South to South, the World Conference aims to enhance a broader international consensus on the Mediterranean diet as a sustainable diet model for today, with country specific variations. This will act as a lever for bridging food production and consumption, in a sustainable and healthy way, in the context of the diversity of Mediterranean food systems.

Starting from the safeguarding of Mediterranean marine ecosystems and the enhancement of blue fish and artisan small scale fisheries, as a symbol of the revitalization of the Mediterranean diet, the World Conference
looks to catalyze and consolidate broader multi-stakeholder actions on the following multiple benefits of the Mediterranean Diet, as a sustainable diet model for contemporary lifestyles:

1) Recognized and well-documented major health and nutrition benefits, in the prevention of chronic diseases and in reducing public health costs as well as in the overall improvement of well-being;

2) Low environmental impact and richness in biodiversity, appreciation of biodiversity value, reduction of pressure on natural resources and mitigation of climate change;

3) Positive local economic returns, sustainable territorial development, reduction of rural poverty;

4) High social and cultural value of food, reduction of food wastes, growth of mutual respect, identity recovery, social inclusion and consumer empowerment.

The Mediterranean diet, as an expression of the diversity of Mediterranean food cultures and their different food and culinary systems, has not yet been fully recognized as a significant resource of sustainable develop-
ment in the Mediterranean region, a potential ‘driver’ in addressing demand towards more sustainable food consumption, thereby influencing the production as a result.

OBJECTIVES

A. To issue the 2019 Palermo Call for a Common Action in the Mediterranean Towards More Sustainable Food Systems and the Revitalization of the Mediterranean Diet as a Sustainable Diet Model Bringing Sustainable Consumption and Production to Accellerate the 2030 Agenda in the Region for Present and Future Generations.

B. To continue to reinforce science-based dialogues between North and South Mediterranean countries to better understand the growing interdependent challenges that all populations are facing in the Mediterranean region, as well as towards the achievement of the Agenda 2030’s SDGs in the Mediterranean region for present and future generations;
C. To identify strategies, programs, projects and actions for improving the sustainability of food systems in the Mediterranean region;

D. To acknowledge the Mediterranean diet as a sustainable diet model, with country-specific territorial variations, for contemporary Mediterranean lifestyles;

E. To consolidate the initiative of the World Conferences of the Revitalization of the Mediterranean Diet as a permanent forum for transdisciplinary dialogues on Mediterranean sustainable food systems using the Mediterranean diet as a lever for bridging consumption and production in a sustainable and healthy way;

F. To foster the development of a “Mediterranean Multi-stakeholder Sustainable Food Systems Platform” within the United Nations One Planet Network, to unlock the potential of research, innovation, sharing know-
ledge and capacity building, between public and private partnerships from North and South Mediterranean countries, to increase more sustainable food consumption and production in the region.

EXPECTED OUTCOME

The 2019 Palermo Call for a Common Action in the Mediterranean Towards More Mediterranean Sustainable Food Systems: CHANGE OF RUOUTE: A Transformational Change in the Region

EXPECTED OUTPUT

The Development of A Mediterranean Multistakeholder Sustainable Food Systems Platform, within the One
Planet Network of United Nations, to accelerate the shift towards more sustainable food consumption and
production in the Mediterranean region.

EXPECTED RESULTS

• Enhancing a transformative sustainable food systems perspective in the Mediterranean to achieve priority SDGs of the Agenda 2030 linking sustainable consumption and production to food security, nutrition and su-
stainability in the Mediterranean region;

• Consolidating international science-based dialogues on the assessment of the sustainability of food systems and diets;

• Addressing the linkages between food, nutrition, natural and human resources, and trade-offs;

• Capacity building in the generation and sharing of research, promoting public–private partnerships and capitalising on opportunities coming from multistakeholder collaborations.